How To Transfer Your Giant Drawings To Your Quilt

So, I have been wanting for a while to make a camo baby quilt with a giant deer quilted onto it. But, I couldn’t figure out how to get the deer on there.  I thought about breaking into a classroom at the college and using an overhead projector to trace the image on, but that seemed like a lot of trouble.

According to the boyfriend, you can professionally print large black and white prints for under $10, so that would have been an option. But, I decided I wanted to use the laser printer to make a design that could be used as an iron-on.

Laser printers print by heating up the ink. Therefore, you can transfer the ink to new surfaces by re-heating it. The transfer is not permanent – in fact, I have had issues with it brushing off before I was done with it. Running the quilt through the wash removed all traces of the ink.

The question was, how would I get a 36 x 44 image printed out onto 8.5×11 sheets of paper? If you use Microsoft Paint, you can print your image onto multiple pages, but you can’t really control how they’re printing, and as far as I know, you can’t control the size by inches, only by pixels. Which doesn’t work for me. To me, inches are a unit of measurement, and pixels are little sparkly things with wings.

This part of the tutorial is for people who have a copy of Photoshop floating around on their computer. Basically, I used “Image Size” to make my image 36×44 inches. Then, I added “Ruler View” so I could, you know, view the ruler. I then made a selection box that was exactly 8 x 10.5 (using the ruler as a guide). I moved the selection box over a part of the image I wanted to print.

I then went into “Print” and chose “Print Selected Area” (making sure it was 100% to scale and landscape oriented) and printed out my 8 x 10.5 inch selection. I then moved my selection box to the next area and printed that, and so on. Till I had this:

Tutorial for transferring large image onto quilt

I printed onto scrap paper. That was kind of dumb, because, yes, the random bits of text also transferred onto my quilt top. D’OH! But, they washed out. So, trees saved! Yeah!

I then flipped my picture over, set it all up, and ran the iron over it (and yes, I just laid the quilt on the floor and ironed on the floor. No, I did not burn the carpet.:
Tutorial for transferring large image onto quilt

I used tape to attach the different pieces together. I had to peel the tape off as I was ironing, so it didn’t melt, but it wasn’t any trouble and kept everything from shifting. It took about 5-10 seconds of high heat to transfer a light version of the image – exactly what I needed:

Tutorial for transferring large image onto quilt

Then, I went over the image lightly with a pencil – just a regular pencil – to make sure the marks didn’t fade.

And then, I quilted the crap out of it!

Camo Quilt with Quilted Deer

Camo Quilt with Quilted Deer

And yes, the final product is for sale on Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/listing/77250323/camo-deer-hunting-baby-boy-quilt

I love the way the deer is strutting across the quilt. I counted and he has like 12 points! Holy crow! This turned out exactly how I dreamed it would. And yes, I dream about quilted deer.

4 thoughts on “How To Transfer Your Giant Drawings To Your Quilt

  1. Sam

    Thanks for the tutorial! This is awesome. My mom is a teacher, so I’ve snuck in and used her overhead projector before, but alas, she is in Ohio so that requires more planning than I’m often capable of. But, this way, no thinking ahead – I can totally wing it!

    Reply
  2. Patrice

    I like to use the rasterbator too. There’s probably too much background noise to iron it, but I find cutting it out and tracing around works great, esp for appliqué.

    The deer looks great!

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Nice Tutorials For Quilting photos | howdoiquilt.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *